Search: "financial statements" Filter:"financial statements"

3 tagged events, 2 books found.


Tagged events

February 2021

FEB 4
We all know that domestic and foreign taxes are based on taxable profits. But how exactly do you account for the current...

Leawood,
United States

FEB 17
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 made company executives personally responsible not only for the accuracy of their company...

Leawood,
United States

FEB 26
When International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) come into effect, public company executives will be personally r...

Leawood,
United States

Books

by Debra L. De Vay

06/15/2006

The collapse of Enron, WorldCom, and other large corporations in 2001 and 2002 motivated Congress to pass the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). The purpose of this legislation was to restore investor confidence in the United States stock markets, and to prevent and detect fraud in financial statements as well. This dissertation examines the effectiveness of SOX for the latter purpose of preventing and detecting fraud, using statistical enforcement data presented by the Securities and Exchange Commission, and financial statement restatement numbers published by the Huron Corporation. The two methodologies utilized to analyze the data were the unpaired t test and the chi square test. Surveys were also emailed to executives and certified public accountants across the country to extract o...

Financial Statement Fraud

Motives, Methods, Cases and Detection

by Khanh Nguyen

04/22/2010

Financial reporting frauds and earnings manipulation have attracted high profile attention recently. There have been several cases by businesses of what appears to be financial statement fraud, which have been undetected by the auditors. In this project, the main purpose is to focus on the nature of financial statement fraud, and fraud schemes regarding to financial statements. The project also discusses common techniques used to detect financial statement frauds. Two cases of the fraudulent financial statements of Enron and WorldCom are analysed.