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16 books found.


Books

The Magic of Yggdrasill

The Poetry of Old Norse Unconscious

by Yves Kodratoff

02/15/2020

This book took its start with the author’s realization that what Old Norse calls 'magic' can be understood as 'unconscious', as stated by C. G. Jung: (we find) "magical means everything where unconscious influences are at work." This book reveals the existence of several Norse words specifically dedicated to magic, as are 'sköp', for instance, and it details the magic they carry with them. In our modern civilization these "skop" still exist but their magical nature is no longer obvious, though this point can be disputed.Once this magic is discovered and acknowledged, it becomes possible to infer from Norse poetry the existence and handling of unconscious archetypes within its associated myths. A few of them have been analyzed in detail and this enabled us to better understand some surp...

Persian Words of Wisdom

Sayings and Proverbs by Masters of Persian Poetry

by Bahman Solati

11/19/2015

What is the secret of happiness? What is the nature of love? What makes us good hosts or good guests? What traits should we seek out in friends and seek to embody as friends ourselves? How should we approach the sensual beauties of this world- when do they induce us to error and when are they signs of God? The poets and bards of many traditions have long sought answers to such questions, but perhaps no culture has taken up this challenge with more passionate urgency than that of Persia, from the ninth century AD to modern-day Iran. These eleven centuries of poetic tradition include poets who have become well-known in the West, such as 'Umar Khayyam, Rumi, and Hafiz, as well as many others whom Westerners have yet to discover. In Iran these poems remain part of everyday popular culture, wit...

Rehabilitating Literary Theory

A Practical Guide for the Critical and Semiotic Analysis of Poetry and Drama

by Khaled Besbes

08/22/2011

The present work seeks to bring literary theory in line with the most recent practical turn the humanities are witnessing. When simplified, succinctly presented, and skillfully used in multi-coded interpretation within a semiocritical framework, literary theories become practical exercises in criticism, not only facilitating the interpretation of literature, but also making it more enjoyable and more rewarding. This book is different from its counterparts in the sense that it includes an exceptionally expanded model of the practice of literary theories, and replaces long and theoretical discussions with brief synopses of the examined theories. It relies on less-overused texts for illustration as it compiles and organizes the terms and phrases that are often used by the proponents of th...

Departure from the Darkness and the Cold

The Hope of Renewal for the Soul of Medicine in Patient Care

by Lawrence J. Hergott, M.D.

03/24/2020

In the midst of the cold and dark in the current practice of medicine there is a glimmer of hope called the soul of medicine - comprehensive, compassionate, patient-clinician interactions focused solely on the needs of the patient - that can warm and enlighten both patients and clinicians. This book consists of essays and poems describing patient-clinician interactions exhibiting the soul of medicine. Though coming from different viewpoints, both the general public and medical personnel can be enlightened from what they read. The general public has the opportunity to witness the lifting of the veil that shades the lives of clinicians and their loved ones - and from that observation, to occasionally understand why patients are treated as they are. For medical practitioners, what is read off...

An Exploration of a New Poetic Expression beyond Dichotomy

An Analytical Approach to the Meta-poetic Features of the Poems of D.H.Lawrence

by Shin'ichiro Ishikawa

03/14/2005

This study attempts to re-evaluate Lawrence's poetry, which has often been read as a set of biographical documents or supplementary notes to his novels, as fully independent literary work in the light of post-modern critical theory. The author carefully examines how Lawrence needed to misread his precursors, the nineteenth-century Romantics, to establish himself as one of the modern poets. What separates his poetry from his precursors' is his self-consciousness as a modern poet. His search for radical freedom in language and his meta-poetic exploration of a new poetic expression make him a true pioneer of the "terra incognita" in English poetry.

Master Players in a Fixed Game

An Extra-Literary History of Twentieth Century African-American Authors

by Ralph D. Story

04/30/2001

The literary expression of Afro-Americans has been scrutinized and criticized in exhaustive detail, yet historically perceived by many American and English literary scholars as qualitatively and quantitatively underdeveloped. This was the view held by many literary scholars until the late 1960s when Afro-American literary scholars and black students argued forcefully and convincingly in favor of the plays, short stories, poetry and novels written by Afro-Americans. Despite such noteworthy efforts, however, few scholars have investigated the uneven and sporadic appearance of publications, or the absence of publications, by black writers in any comprehensive fashion. Thus, the dissertation examines the various extra-literary problems faced by Afro-American writers which have contributed to e...

Poets on the Edge

Vicente Huidobro, Cesar Vallejo, Juan Luis Martinez, and Nestor Perlongher

by Jesus Sepulveda

02/01/2016

Poets on the Edge critically explores the relationship between poetry and its context through the work of four Latin American poets: Chilean Vicente Huidobro (1898-1948), Peruvian Cesar Vallejo (1893-1938), Chilean Juan Luis Martínez (1943-1993), and Argentine Nestor Perlongher (1949-1992). While Huidobro and Vallejo establish their poetics on the edge in the context of worldwide conflagrations and the emergence of the historical avant-garde during the first half of the twentieth century, Martinez and Perlongher produce their work in the context of the Chilean and Argentine dictatorships respectively, developing different strategies to overcome the panoptic societies of control installed throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Martínez recreates the avant-garde tradition in a playful manner to ...

Boyington Oak

A Grave Injustice

by Mary S. Palmer

11/06/2019

One hundred and eighty-five years ago, a live oak tree sprouted in the Church Street Graveyard as Charles Boyington predicted it would as proof of his innocence. Police charged nineteen-year-old journeyman printer, poet, and musician with the murder of his best friend, Nathaniel Frost, in that same graveyard May 10, 1834. His pleas proclaiming innocence went unheard as an unqualified jury convicted him, and the guilty verdict remains suspect even today. The tainted jury selection process allowed two unqualified men to serve, and the prosecutor used only circumstantial evidence to convict Boyington. This story is based on events that have since become folklore in Mobile, Alabama. It is about a nineteen-year-old printer, Charles R.S. Boyington, who was unjustly convicted and hanged for kil...

I Came, I Saw, I Translated

An Accelerated Method for Learning Classical Latin in the 21st Century

by Drew A. Mannetter

01/11/2012

I Came, I Saw, I Translated employs a new method to learn Latin. There are numerous distinctive features which set this textbook apart from others on the market. It is aimed at a mature audience of high school or college-aged students. It discusses English grammar concurrently with the Latin grammar. There is no adapted Latin; instead, a primary literature narrative is utilized from the very first word. Book Reviews: Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2013.02.17 by Beert C. Verstraete In nearly all Latin primers for universities and colleges, the student is guided through the grammar in a gradual and incremental manner. Typically, with nouns the first two declensions come first, along with the use of the nominative and the accusative case, and with verbs the first conjugation and perhaps the...

Fictionality and Reality in Narrative Discourse

A Reading of Four Contemporary Taiwanese Writers

by Li-fen Chen

12/20/1999

This dissertation is an attempt to define a Chinese "modernism," exemplified by the narrative practices of four major writers in Taiwan today, from the perspective of comparative literature and recent development of literary theory. I propose that modernity of Taiwanese fiction is not so much a result of Western influences as an evolution of Chinese narrative tradition itself. To argue my point I delineate a poetics of Chinese narrative, from which I devise a method of reading and a criterion of evaluation for contemporary Taiwanese fiction in defining its achievement and historical significance. This study of Taiwanese fiction also aims at providing a better understanding of fundamental aesthetic assumptions of Western "modernism" in the context of its own literary tradition. Chapter One...

The Sound and the Fury in the Garden of Eden

William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury and the Garden of Eden Myth

by John P. Anderson

02/02/2002

This non-academic author brings the Garden of Eden myth alive as sophisticated poetry and a polemic for women and the consciousness of freedom. The myth is explored line by line using the tools of literary analysis and modern ideas, including Freudian concepts. The analysis shows how its "J" author, thought to be a woman in the royal court of Judah around 1000 BCE, uses the techniques of sound association, puns and other sophisticated means to get her messages across. The analysis probes how after thousands of years this myth still speaks to us about the critical human experiences of sex and death and their bigger brothers freedom and limitation. Then this author shows how Faulkner used concepts from the Garden of Eden in structuring his most stunning and difficult stream of consciou...

Notes for a New Mind

Brain Lateralization, Deconstruction, and the New Myth

by William C. Dell

05/06/2005

What is known about the split brain is reviewed, in a historical context, as a paradigm for a new mind. The poetry of William Wordsworth is examined as a precursor to this mentality. The possibility of a new mind (and its new myth: the deconstruction) emerging from the split brain in the modern world is set forth. The last issue of consciousness, perhaps, is not the resolution of duality, but is the multiform periphery. The question is: am I more than my brain?

Nordic Magic Healing

1:Healing galdr, healing runes

by Yves Kodratoff

06/06/2003

Galdr is a song or howling by which a poem written in runes is "made active". Anthropological texts will often describe a healing ritual where the healer has been seen to mutter some indistinct words over the patient. This book gives these 'mutterings' back their true meaning and importance. It will also explain their rational value by clearly stating the root causes of the sickness, and explore their religious meaning. The poetry and creativity of these chants combine to form a very effective healing technique, albeit a very difficult one. Many will be familiar with karate's 'scream that kills', that came to us from the East. We will explore the 'scream (or song) that heals' called galdr by the Norse. In this book, galdr will be explored in two ways: by looking at a new interpreta...

J. Henry Shorthouse, "The Author of John Inglesant"

(with reference to T. S. Eliot and C. G. Jung)

by Charles W. Spurgeon

06/06/2003

When J. Henry Shorthouse (1834-1903) published John Inglesant in 1881, he contributed a unique synthesis of Anglo-Catholic sensibilities to the enduring legacy of the Oxford Movement. Although his "philosophical romance" has been acclaimed "the greatest Anglo-Catholic novel in English literature" and "the one English novel that speaks immediately to human intuition without regard to the reader's own faith or philosophy", his most enduring contributions are the "religion of John Inglesant", an Anglo-Catholic synthesis of obedience and freedom, faith and reason, and the sacramental vision of "the myth of Little Gidding". The popular success of John Inglesant transformed the quiet, middle-class, Birmingham manufacturer into "the author of John Inglesant", apologi...

Hindsight in the Home

Record what you did and when you did it!

by Jane F. Brittain

08/15/1999

Simplify your life with the book that will help you to keep track of the many details of running an apartment; a condo; a townhouse or even a houseboat more efficiently and economically than ever before! Do you need to tie a string around your finger to... Change batteries in the clock, fire detectors, calculators? Order enough paint or paper to spruce up the guest room in time for Aunty Em's visit. Be ready with receipts for the new swimming pool when it's income tax season? Check out the air conditioner before a heat wave? Shampoo the rug? IT'S JUST TOO MUCH! Let Hindsight in the Home take the worry out of maintaining your home. It's easy and it's fun. Enjoy the poetry! It will give you a chuckle when things look bleak such as when you didn't order enou...

Tourism Writing

A New Literary Genre Unveiling the History, Mystery, and Economy of Places and Events

by Mary S. Palmer

08/20/2018

In this era of advanced technology keeping students' attention often becomes difficult. Teachers need to find new ways to create interest. In writing classes, choosing a topic that involves students is a priority. A new genre, Tourism Writing, is an innovative and effective means of teaching students composition. It can fill this need.Tourism Writing focuses on a particular place or event, provides photos and information on nearby points of interest, and directly invites visitors. This book provides an understanding of how Tourism Writing benefits people in all areas of life. This transfers to classroom assignments when students are asked to write a poem in this genre and they are given lists of possible topics, but they also have the option to choose their own place or event. It becomes a...